Fall Courses

Language Courses for Fall 

FREN 1001 - Basic French I (1st Year)
FREN 1002 - Basic French II (1st Year)
FREN 1003 - Intermediate French I (2nd Year)
FREN 1004 - Intermediate French II (2nd Year)
FREN 2005 - Language, Culture, and Society I (3rd Year)
FREN 2006 - Language, Culture, and Society II (3rd Year)

 

Upper-level French courses, Fall 2020

All courses will be taught in French
 
French 3010W: Advanced French Language, Structure and Composition
Prof. Sarah-Kay Hurst
 
How did English words like le week-end end up in French? Why do words like forêt and fête have an accent? Why do we pay attention in English but faire attention in French? Why do the words vingt and doigt have an unpronounced “g” in them? In this course, you will refine your French by integrating notions from linguistics, improving your written and spoken French through new perspectives into the language itself. You will have myriad opportunities to strengthen your writing skills for different personal and professional contexts, and we will explore notions such as register, borrowings, idiomatic expressions, and stylistic variation between French and English.  
Prerequisite: Fren 2006
 
French 3100W: Introduction to French Literature
Prof. Kathryn Kleppinger
 
What does it mean to produce literature in a time of crisis? How can authors, poets, and filmmakers help us make sense of a world thrown into chaos? In this course, we will explore several major works of French fiction, poetry, and film to gain a better sense of how French artists have grappled with questions that still resonate today. From the bloody wars of religion to the French Revolution to World War II, French society has endured its share of upheaval, and French artists such as Ronsard, Voltaire, Victor Hugo, and Albert Camus have developed innovative ways of understanding the human experience in such contexts. As a WID course, this class will involve weekly writing assignments and close reading papers with drafting, revision, and peer review activities. 
Prerequisite: Fren 2006
 
 
French 3210: Medieval and Early Modern French Literature in Context
Prof. Pauline Goul
 
From the Middle-Ages to the seventeenth century, France sees the development of several genres and literary movements that are foundational to the French literary traditions: the epic, the fable, the narrative genre, the essay, poetry, tragedy, comedy, and the fairy tale are the various genres of premodern France that we will study. In order to understand the context for such a variety of textual forms, we will discuss the themes that were important to premodern French authors and cultures, not least of them medievalism, Renaissance, and classicism. What makes these texts classics, and what do they still have to say for our time? 
Prerequisite: Fren 3100W
 
French 3600: Fairy Tales
Prof. Pauline Goul
 
Did you know that many fairy tales, from Cinderella to Beauty and the Beast, were written in French in the 17th century? In fact, the evolution of the genre owes a lot to women writers. Ripe with darkness, magic, witches, dwarves, and transformations, fairy tales were also instrumental in constructing ideas about beauty and love, and about the place of women in society that are valid for us today. Were fairy tales the first “Strong Female Lead” narratives or did they merely perpetuate the motif of damsels in distress? Were they early critiques of patriarchy? In this class, we will study a variety of French fairy tales, both early modern and modern (both text and film) together with theoretical texts about folklore and feminism.
Prerequisite: Fren 3100W
 
 
French 4540: Power, Politics and the Press in Nineteenth-Century France
Prof. Masha Belenky
 
From the launch of Emile de Girardin’s groundbreaking newspaper La Presse in 1836 to Emile Zola’s pivotal article “J’Accuse” in Aurore in 1898, the press played a key role culture and politics in 19th-century France.  This course will examine the complex power interplay between the press and the novel against the background of the tumultuous  political events in nineteenth-century France. We will read novels by canonical authors such as Balzac, Zola and Maupassant along with studying the 19th-c press in order to investigate ways in which these two types of discourses mutually influenced each other just as they vied for political and cultural power.
Prerequisite: Fren 3100W
 
French 4600: French Crime Writing
Prof. Kathryn Kleppinger
 
In this course we will study the French tradition of crime writing: from the obsession with poverty in the 19th century to political corruption in the 20th, we will take a historical approach to understanding how crime novels and films have exposed some of French society’s deepest, darkest secrets. We will read literary, historical, and philosophical sources for deeper analysis of the stakes of the genre’s social critique. Students will be expected to prepare one medium-length close reading analysis of one of the works under study as well as an independent research project bringing together the themes of the course. 
Prerequisite: Fren 3100W
 
French 4910: Proseminar for French Majors
Prof. Masha Belenky
 
Capstone for French Majors. Includes reading major works of the French canon and preparation of senior essay.